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The Evil Little Troll

Spooky and Creepy things in Potter County History

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On this page you will learn about some of the "freakier" stuff in Potter County History, and if it freaks you out imagine how i feel i live here!

Weird things from the Sky.......... ( please note that all information here is listed in different parts of Old Potter Co newspapers, and Books)

Once known as the Forbidden Land, the Pennsylvania Black Forest region encompasses Clinton, Potter, Lycoming, Tioga, Cameron, and McKean counties. Predominantly sparsely populated state forest and game lands, it has been haunted for centuries by giant aves known as "thunderbirds."

The earliest known account is that of Mrs. Elvira Ellis Coats, who claimed to have seen Thunderbirds in the 1840's (Lyman, Sr., Robert R. Amazing Indeed, Strange Events in the Black Forest vol 2. 94). But even now, people continue to claim having seen this mythical bird.

On Thanksgiving Day 1989, Shannon Breiner saw what she thought was a deer on her grandmother's farm near Barbours. When she approached, the creature stood up on two legs and ran towards the swamp. Before it was out of sight, she saw it had no arms!
The creature was "a large eagle-like bird." Where she first spotted the bird she saw a mound of grass flattened in the center like a large ground nest. Breiner, a librarian at Pennsylvania State University is an avid raptor enthusiast. "Not a stork or heron, it had a shorter and thicker neck, and broad chest and shoulders. Not a frail bird," she said.
The area around Barbours (not far from Hughesville) has coniferous and deciduous forest, high elevations, swamp and farmland, and is sparsely populated. Ideal for a giant bird of prey.

While solo backpacking the Doughnut Hole Trail in Sproul State Forest in August 1977, Terry McCormick, a science teacher, saw what he thought "was an airplane in trouble because of how low and silent it flew, as if the engine had cut out." As he watched the plane fly near he realized "it was a bird and when it flapped its wings once and flew out of sight."

McCormick described it as dark brownish gray with a large beak and a straight leading wing edge. Certainly larger than any known eagle. "At least not one I've ever seen before," McCormick said before balking about its size. "How big is a Piper Cub? Because that's how big it looked," he said.
Driving through the Algerines, Russ Powers, Jr. and Denny Eckley stopped for deer crossing the road at Bear Run. As they watched, they saw a bird with wings that "spanned the forest road." The deer bolted into the surrounding woods, except the yearling that stood on the road. Out of nowhere the bird attacked, ripping the yearling's vital areas, and turned to look at them. It flew off struggling with its kill before disappearing above the trees.
Powers described the bird as having: "a longer and less hooked beak than an eagle, dark grayish brown plumage, thick legs, talons larger than a man's hand, and grayish legs." The head was flat with "feathers, like on a chick." The bird stood "eye level with us" and had wings as wide as the forest road, approximately 14-16 feet.
Later Powers and Eckley went to a library and found a photograph in what Powers thought might be The Guiness Book of World Records. The photo depicted a giant bird nailed to a barn wall with the caption "Thunderbird" greatly resembled what they saw.
Often people believe they have seen a particular photograph of a giant bird but cannot recall the source (Hall, Mark, Thunderbirds, 65-66) This mysterious photograph resurfaces from time to time in "thunderbird" lore and is an autonomous enigma.
In August, 1945, the school bus left Helen Erway off by Ole Bull 2 miles from home because the dirt road had been oiled. After walking near a stretch of pines along the road she saw a large shadow on the ground. Overhead was a very large bird. She feared being carried off, so she ran until a neighbor stopped and drove her home. "It was not an eagle. The wings were straight out. It made a high pitch noise. The shadow on the road was about 30 feet," she said recalling the incident.
Erway suffered severe nightmares and could not sleep or eat. Finally her parents took her to her grandmother, Marion Erway, an Indian "medicine woman", who told her she saw a Thunder Bird. That it was there to protect her because she was part Indian. Her grandmother said it was a magic moment and that Helen shouldn't be frightened.
Helen Erway also told of a "thunderbird" hovering over Delbert Schoonover, when he was bitten by a rattlesnake by the dam, until help arrived. Other loggers who came to assist him also saw the bird.
Contemporary "thunderbirds" are not limited to the scenic areas of the Keystone State. Significant sightings have occurred in Illinois, West Virginia, and other states across America. Not surprising since the Thunder Bird myth was as wide spread among the Native Americans.
The Thunder Bird is a nature spirit shared by most if not all Algonquian tribes (McClintock, Walter. "The Thunderbird Myth I" 170 and 16; also Alanson Skinner, "The Algonkin and The Thunderbird" 71-72).
According to Winnabego tradition, "Thunder is a spirit, and it is an emblem of war, it is winged, mighty and awful and it is called the Thunder Bird." (Curtis, Natalie, THE INDIANS BOOK: Song & Legends of the American Indian 252).
The Chippewa supreme bird had "eyes of fire, his glance was lightning, and the motions of his wings filled the air with thunder." (Emerson, Ellen Russell. Indian Myths 34). Concerning the origins of thunderstorms, "The Mandan supposed that it was because the thunderbird broke through the clouds (Hodge, Frederick Webb Handbook of American Indians (North of Mexico) 747)."
This colloquial nomenclature to identify a raptor larger than an eagle is presumably inappropriate since the Thunder Bird in the majority of Native American myths is benevolent toward humans. "Thunder Bird... was a friend of man... a willing protector; ...also a teacher and, at times, a creator" (Wherry, Joseph E. Indian Myths of the West 59-60). "It was the Thunderbird who taught the Kwakiutl how to build houses." (Wherry 60-65).
An Assiniboin account claims, "...but the old Thunder, or big bird is wise and excellent, he never kills or injures anyone" (Judson, Katherine B. Myths and Legend of the Great Plains 48).
But a Comanche story differs, "...a hunter once shot a large bird...it was so large he was afraid to go near it alone..." (Judson, 47). The hunter believed he shot a Thunder Bird. When he returned with the Medicine Man and others from the village, the bird was gone, and the hunter was struck by lightning during the resulting storm. This tale implies another large bird, not a mythical deity, but an earthly creature, existed concurrently with early Native Americans.
Thunder Bird lore can be classified as a benevolent nature deity or a malicious predator; not a spirit but mortal and co-extant with the aboriginal inhabitants of pre-colonial North America. The non-spirit myth might lead to the conceivable origins of giant birds reported in more recent times.
Powerful enough to carry away full grown deer, the piasa was a bird of prey and in spite of its size, could quickly surprise a hunter and carry him off to devour him in its cave. Entire villages were decimated.
A painted rock once existed near present day Alton, Illinois honoring Chief Ouatago and his band of twenty braves who slew the beast and delivered the Illini from its grizzly depredations (Russell, John. "The Piasa, An Indian Tradition of the Illinois", The Piasa 11-19).
The Hu-huk (Hoh-hoq) was a mythical bird of prey among the Pawnee was said to devour hunters (Curtis 258). Described as cannibalistic it is similar in behavior to the piasa; having tasted human flesh preferred it to deer.
"According to Indian legends the thunderbird flew down, seized a victim by the shoulders, and carried the prey to a barren mountain top where it was devoured. First the belly was ripped open, while the victim was still alive, and then the insides were eaten. Lastly, it picked a hole in the skull and ate the brain.
The Indians said it was capable of carrying away deer or a man" (Lyman, Sr. Amazing Indeed 93). Lyman's "thunderbird" is unlikely the same Thunder Bird mentioned in the vast amount of Native American myths.
Other accounts of giant birds preying on humans in post-colonial times exist. Stories such as Marie Delex and Jemmie Kenny (Pouchet, F. The Universe 255), Landy Junkins ("A Modern Roc" St. Louis Globe Democrat, February 1895 7) and Marlon Lowe (The Daily Pantograph July 1977 A-3) which irritate ornithologists fearing unwarranted attacks on more familiar and endangered species.
But also, these tales appear to substantiate Indian accounts of immense avian carnivores lingering from a neolithic past which might still exist in the most remote parts of North America, like the Black Forest region of Pennsylvania.

Regional historian and folklorist, Robert Lyman, Sr. recorded "thunderbird flocks" were seen near Dent's Run in 1892, (94).

In April 1922, Hiram Crammer saw his first Thunderbird with a 35 foot wing spread at Hammersley Fork. In 1957 "thunderbirds" appeared regularly over Renovo, Westport, Shintown, and Hammersley Fork (Cranmer's letter-to-the-editor, FATE, August 1957, also Lyman 94).

Near Bush Dam in 1964, road workers watched a "thunderbird" carry off a fawn (Lyman 95). A couple saw a giant bird fly at the car. "She said the claw was at least 4 times as big as her hand, and its legs as large as her arm..."
"Thunderbirds" soared over Jersey Shore in 1970, with estimated 18 foot wings. A family saw a "gigantic winged creature... almost like an airplane" (96).
In 1971, two women saw a "'thunderbird' devouring a dead opossum, "...its wings covered the tops of four trees which was 18 feet" (97).
In 1892, a farmer in Centerville caught a bird eating a dead cow at the edge of his field. Former Potter County school superintendent, A. P. Akeley, saw the bird and said "its color was grey. It stood upright. He is not sure how tall it was, but certainly over 4 feet and perhaps as much as 6 feet" (Lyman 97).
Near Coudersport in 1940, Lyman Sr. sighted a huge bird "between 3 and 4 feet tall... like a very large vulture.... its wing spread was equal to the width of the road..." (97).
The number of giant birds sighted in Pennsylvania were numerous enough for Mark A. Hall to devote a chapter on "Pennsylvania Thunderbirds," in his book Natural Mysteries (67-82, also see Thunderbirds). He lists additional sightings at Jersey Shore, Oregon Hill, Sundlinerville, Cross Forks, by Lyman and others, and the last near Snow Shoe by Herb Nesman (Hall 77-78). Nesman also later revealed that he and several others had seen small flocks near Hammersley Fork in the 1940's and recalled Cranmer's theories about "thunderbirds" and the Eastern Condor (another regional avian myth).
After the Agnes [Hurricane] Flood of 1973, a Renovo librarian watched what appeared to be two airplanes dipping and diving in tight circles above Hyner. She realized "they were not airplanes, but birds the size of planes high in the air. No plane could fly like that," she said.
A woman in Hyner, while hanging the wash with her infant in a basket beside her, saw a bird bigger than an eagle overhead. She dropped the wash, grabbed the child, and rushed into the house. The bird flew within thirty feet of her home. She had never mentioned it before. Another reason for the dearth of contemporary reports: observer reluctance to speak.

Mike Floryshak, Sr. was near Huntsville in summer of 1973 when he saw an airplane flying across a field before he realized it was a bird "...gliding about six to ten feet above the ground beside the car. I didn't think it possible," he said, "the wings appeared to be twenty feet wide." It was "dirty brown," with a large beak and very level, stiff wings. The bird didn't flap but turned on edge and disappeared into woods bordering the farm.

Late one afternoon, Charlie Passell and others sighted a "thunderbird" west of Renovo in late May, 1964. The bird was spotted perched in a dead Hemlock tree at a strip mine near Bush dam. "Where the wing meets the body was thick, longer neck than a hawk's but not as long as a stork or crane, bigger beak than an eagle," he said. Passell heard of "thunderbirds" and figured "that's what we must've seen because it wasn't like any bird we were familiar with. Definitely no eagle. Larger than a buzzard, real large."
From his camp at Kettle Creek, Robert Lyman, Jr., son of the regional historian and folklorist, sighted "thunderbirds" over Rattle Snake Mountain in 1973. Too far to notice any distinctive markings, he used his forestry skills to estimate the size of the bird.
"Over the very tall mountain in front of the camp, I saw two huge birds, slow wing thrusts, I used my finger nail to triangulate the size. By knowing distance and height of the mountain I calculated the wing span between 14-15 feet."
Lyman's father recorded "thunderbird" reports from Hiram Cranmer, a central figure in "thunderbird" lore. Both men professed theories about the "thunderbird" and the "Eastern condor" (Gymnogyps pennsylvanianus). Lyman, Jr. regards the "thunderbird" and the "Eastern Condor" as being distinctly separate species aptly describing the Eastern condor as identical to the California condor (G. californianus) except for minor variation in plumage (G. pennsylvanianus is lighter, the head darker). [Gymnogyps fossil remains were found in Genesee County, NY, north of the Black Forest].
Regarding the "Thunderbird" photograph Lyman, Jr. commented, "I've seen that photograph Hi Cranmer claimed to have." Crystal, Lyman Jr.'s daughter, recalled the photograph, possibly in Ripley's Believe It or Not.
Because of the frequent sightings, Lyman, Sr. speculated the "thunderbird" home is in the Black Forest, "north of the Susquehanna River, between Pine Creek in the east and Kettle Creek in the west (97)." But sightings have occurred in Clearfield, Cameron and Centre counties, beyond Lyman's designated boundaries.
In Spring of 1977 two Curwensville school teachers, Debbie Wright and Sue Howell, while driving to Du Bois about 7:30 am were unsettled by a very large bird "wider than the car." It flew straight at them before it veered away.
The sighting occurred on Route 219 near Drocker's Woods about nine miles south of Du Bois, bordered by State Game Lands No. 87 and Moshannon State Forest. Sue Howell said, "It was big, black or very dark brown with a huge beak." Debbie Wright said, "It was horrible, big, black and ugly. I'll never forget that. It was frightening!"
A large, charcoal grey bird perched on a rock in the Susquehanna parallel Route 879 at Curwensville was seen twice by a Clearfield store clerk. She first saw the bird about 9:00 am in the early Autumn 1991 and in October 1992, near the same spot at 7:30 am while on the way to work.
The bird stood on one leg, head twisted around and the beak nuzzled over the shoulder. She said the legs were "thick like an ostrich and it appeared to be sleeping." It wasn't a Great Blue Heron.
Truck drivers on Boot Jack Hill, north of the Howell/Wright sighting, were "harassed by large dark birds resembling "big buzzards" over the last few years.
This extended range of recent sightings could indicate populations spreading into "thunderbird" territory, while strip-mining and developments force the bird into more populated areas. Eagles are not known as domiciles and rarely frequent the area. The observers are certain the birds sighted are strikingly larger than eagles.
How can an immense unknown avian species elude detection? If the "thunderbird" exists then why haven't people reported it?
People have. But the reports are denied and trained observers fail to investigate. Most reports come from people who live in the areas and have a greater chance of sighting the bird than infrequent visitors. To dismiss the reports as "too incredible" lacks scientific rigor.
The opinion that all witnesses are incapable of identifying eagles, hawks, or vultures is a false assumption. The most outstanding and condemning feature is the bird's tremendous size. Even skilled observers have difficulty accurately assessing the size of a bird in the air. An eagle in flight is an awe inspiring sight.
Witnesses agree their reports are fantastic and hard to believe yet attest that the extraordinary bird they saw cannot be a known species.
Another argument against the "thunderbird" as a "bona fide" species is that no bird with so wide a wingspan could dwell in the thick forests where it has been sighted. Yet, the world's two largest eagles, the Harpy (Harpyia harpyia) and the Monkey Eater (Pithecophaga jefferyi) live near rivers in dense tropical forests. Both prey on primates and have ten foot wingspans.
Like most tropical birds their plumage is colorful and they possess other features which rule out a several thousand mile periodic visit to scenic Pennsylvania. But is it unreasonable to consider a similar North American species?
Not unless one wonders how it was able to remain undiscovered for so long a time and still secreted from eyes of contemporary naturalists.
Early pioneers considered the "thunderbird" to be an eagle other than the Bald and Golden eagles already known, like Audubon's Great Washington Eagle. The Monkey Eater of the Philippines was only discovered by John Whitehead in 1896 (Heuvelmans, Bernard. On the Track of Unknown Animals, 20) while a year earlier a distant kin might have been nesting in Webster Springs ("A Modern Roc" St Louis Globe Democrat).
John Audobon, famed naturalist and artist, twice had sighted what he referred to as the Great Washington eagle (present day ornithologists claim is the juvenile of the Bald eagle) once near Alton, and the other time en route through northern Pennsylvania.
Also regional lore claims Mark Twain while writing on rock (in present day Ravensburg State Park) and Edgar Allen Poe (now Poe Valley) sighted immense black birds in Pennsylvania.
Collectively the sightings possess more common than contrary characteristics. To dismiss the reports as embellished tales, hoaxes and fabrications prejudges the issue. Native American accounts regarding mythic birds of prey coincide with contemporary living folklore.
To suggest an identity for the illusive Thunderbird is difficult since no verified physical evidence has been collected; such as nests, feathers, droppings, or even the "mythic" photographs.

Speculative analysis of the empirical evidence says more about what the "thunderbird" is not, than what it might be. But what it is not might lead to what it is. Yet one fact remains, an avian of immense dimensions has been sighted again in the remote areas of Pennsylvania's Black Forest.

Ghost Lights on the Ground...........

Galeton - Potter County Railroad - Mysterious lights have been sited behind the Ox Yoke, strange inhuman, non-animal sounds can be heard. Although Galeton is the most popular area of the County to see these lights, they have been known to appear in the Genessee Area as well.

Ghostly Happenings around Rose Lake .......

Long before the advent of the Whites, there lived in Central New York an Indian boy by the name of Oriado. When grown up he was called Big Tree or White Pine, a name given him on account of his unusual stature.

As a child he was noted as queer on account of his gentle conduct and his fondness for flowers and birds rather than for the usual sports of the young Indian boy.

In due time he acquired a wigwam and a squaw and to them several children were born, including a daughter. As a warrior White Pine was one of the bravest and most tireless, as a hunter he had no superiors but when the strife was over he was noted for his peaceful disposition – and in hunting would never kill more than was absolutely necessary for present needs.

Returning home with a war party he found his wife had died during his absence and never again did White Pine engage in war with the neighboring tribes.

With his children he removed to the Oswah-yah (now known as Oswayo), "The beautiful River of Pines" or the "Lovely Valley of Pines," a fanciful and descriptive name.

The stream, considerably larger than since the timber has been cut, clear as crystal, gliding along silently in long reaches, then rippling over gravel bars where the deer came to drink, not timid for there was little to make them afraid.

The valley broad was covered with magnificent timber thickly interspersed with lordly white pine, towering far above the beech, maple and elm trees, the forest floor covered with plants and wild flowers, flecked here and there with splotches of sunshine where it had filtered through the dense forest of leaves overhead.

The bordering hills for miles and miles were covered to the very top with pine and hemlock that some years later brought wealth to many families.

Nowhere in Northern Pennsylvania could be found a fairer location for a home for one who loved nature. Fish, game and fur bearing animals were plentiful and easily captured.

The pine trees were always furnishing music, murmuring and whispering their Nature songs – never silent. During a storm or wind loud and clear, sinking away to a whisper when the air was quiet, but never entirely silent, sweeter music than any man-made instrument ever produced.

Only to the lonesome is the song of the pine tree a "moaning" sound. In its louder tones it is a song of joy and gladness and its whispering is like the soft crooning of the mother over the fretful child in her arms.

Into this beautiful Valley of the Oswah-yah came the sorrowful red man and not far from what is now the village of Ceres, he erected a new lodge and a new home, supplying its wants from the woods and streams which furnished an abundance.

This section of Northern Pennsylvania was then neutral ground, especially in peace time, there being no permanent villages, but visitors were not uncommon from hunting parties and those traveling to and fro between the Allegheny and Genesee waters.

The daughter grew to be an accomplished and handsome maiden according to Indian standards and, on account of her great beauty, was called the White Lily.

Many a young hunter from the Genesee and the Allegheny sought her for wife to grace his wigwam and cook his game, but for a long time she would have none of them.

Finally a young (and of course handsome) Seneca from the Genesee succeeded in winning her favor. The two young people moved to his lodge on the Genesee somewhere near the state line where they lived happily and contented.

Once each year the young people visited White Pine for a few days and once each year the visit was returned. To the White Lily and her brave only a single child, a daughter, was born. She was given the Indian name "Sawque-Hanna," which meant Trailing Arbutus.

One day a hunger from the Allegheny stopped at the peaceful home of White Lily and her husband, remaining for several days.

He became infatuated with her, paying her every attention, and finally proposing that she leave her husband and go with him to his home on the Allegheny and become his wife.

His request was received with scorn and he was ordered by her never to enter the lodge again. The hunter left in a rage, declaring that he would return later and that she should become his squaw.

A year later the hunter came back accompanied by three others. He was seen by White Lily and she was filled with foreboding for herself and her family.

That night after the return of her husband from the chase, the door of the lodge was burst open and an arrow from the hunter’s bow killed the husband and a second arrow took the life of Trailing Arbutus as she sat on her father’s lap.

The lodge was destroyed after such of its contents as was considered valuable and could easily be transported was removed.

The hands of White Lily were bound behind her back and a start made for the Allegheny waters. When near what is now Andrews Settlement a stop was made for breakfast, shortly after daylight, and here the bereaved White Lily was unbound that she might eat.

Here the hunter spoke for the first time saying, "I told you that you should be mine. Indians never lie. In two days we will eat at my wigwam on the Allegheny and you shall be my squaw."

White Lily, watching her opportunity here, made a break for liberty and sped like a frightened deer away from the hated hunters. Pursuit was almost immediate as the hunters recovered from their surprise.

As she came in sight of the beautiful little lake not far away, surrounded by primeval forest, it was evident to her that she could not escape the unwanted hunters.

White Lily, breaking into the death song of her tribe, plunged into the icy cold waters and when near the center of the lake, throwing her arms toward the sky above, with a wild despairing cry to the Great Spirit, sank forever.

The pursuers were dumbfounded, but soon recovering made a diligent search about the banks and fallen trees that here and there lay partially submerged in the water.

They could not believe that White Lily could have been drowned after seeing the speed and apparent ease with which she had reached the middle of the small lake, but rather thought the sinking was a ruse and that she had swum under water and hidden under some treetop or old log, later on to reach the shore and proceed to her old home down the Oswah-yah.

Search failed to find any trace of White Lily and, leaving the youngest of their party concealed to watch the shore nearest the Oswah-yah, the three others returned and moved their belongings and stolen property to the shores of the lake.

Scarcely had they reached the shores of the lake when dark clouds, wind, thunder and lightning were terrific, the trees bowed before the storm, and the very earth trembled and seemed to rock and crumple as with internal disturbances.

The rugged hemlock under which they had taken refuge was shattered and the earth was turned up as by the hand of the Great Spirit.

And from that day to this, the waters of the lake which before had flowed into the Oswah-yah, found an outlet into the Genesee, flowing by the one-time home of White Lily.

The three hunters were killed and their bodies burned almost to cinders by the lightning – a fitting retribution at the hands of the Red Man’s God.

The fourth Indian left to watch the lake shore escaped with his life and conscience stricken fled down the Oswah-yah, telling his tale to some temporary residents who returned with him to search for the body of White Lily.

The body was never found, the Lake being very deep, and although watch was kept for some time the body never came to the surface.

In examining a treetop bent over into the lake, the last of the murderers missed his footing, fell into the waters, sank to the bottom of the lake and perished miserably.

The following year, at the point where the Indian wife entered the lake, a bunch of water lilies grew to the surface of the water, much finer and larger than the surrounding plants and the blossoms were unusually large and of a pearly whiteness, the surrounding plants producing only yellow flowers.

From this time on the lake was known as White Lily Lake and the white blossoms were believed to be the spirit of White Lily who had perished in these waters. No Indian would ever pluck one of the white blossoms appearing each succeeding year.

White Pine, whose mind had weakened year by year, could not seem to realize that his daughter was no more. He waited in vain for the annual visit and finally took the trail to meet her, passing beyond the lake and down the stream where he made a home, waiting for one who was to come no more.

Passing hunters visited and assisted him when possible. He was able to supply himself with game although an old man was reverenced by the hunters as one particularly under the charge and care of the Great Spirit.

One day early in the Spring, a party of hunters visited the lodge to find it abandoned and the roof fallen in. Nearby was the body of White Pine, his clothing rotten as though exposed to many winter storms, though the body itself appeared as though death had occurred but a few hours before. At his feet was the decayed remains of his dog.

Here was proof positive to the minds of the Indians of the care and love of the Great Spirit for one of his cherished children. Among all the Indian tribes the weak and feeble minded were considered as under the special care and love of the Indian’s God.

They carefully removed the body to the top of the hill with the bones of the dog and the implements of the chase, where all were interred and a mound of earth raised, the last resting place of White Pine.

Rose Lake is the only natural lake in Potter County, located near Andrews Settlement in Allegany Township. When this section was surveyed for settlement it was given the name of Rose Lake, so called for the name of one of the surveyors, Mr. Rose.

The story of the changing of the outlet of the lake from the Oswayo to the Genesee was told by O. J. Rees, a Potter County surveyor, many years ago.

The authority given was an Indian hunter’s story of more than a hundred years ago and handed down "that the occurrence was the vengeance of the Great Spirit on three bad Indians who had driven to death in the lake a squaw they had captured."

The final ending of White Pine, another story we heard long ago, of an Indian called Big Tree who came up the Oswah-yah to meet his daughter, waiting long for her appearance in vain.

More than forty years ago a mound was opened on the top of the hill below Andrews Settlement overlooking the old Indian trail.

In it was found the jaw bone of a man, a few of the larger bones, a bone or two of a dog and stone implements used by the Red Man before the coming of the whites.

From measurements that could be made the man found in the mound must have been all of seven feet in height.

The fragmental stories so interlock that they conclusively prove to be one story – The White Lily, Pine Tree of the Oswah-yah and Big Tree of the Genesee.

It would not take very much of an excavation today to turn the waters of Rose Lake from the Genesee back to the Oswayo.

Another writer of long ago explained the formation of Rose Lake thusly; The great ice cap of the north that moved southward in Pleistocene days, bringing the debris of hills and valleys with it, reached its main limits near Olean and the present day Rock City where the melting ice left stranded the great gravel hills there.

But the line shifted with the seasons. Sometime, a long tongue of ice slid up the valley of the Oswayo and up the channel of this ancient creek, pushing the soil before it, to build this little hill that dams the valley and created this lake.

But little drainage flows into this lake from the upper hills of the watershed. The lake forms a stabilizer for the currents that flow quietly out of it at flood times, eventually to reach the Genesee; so quietly that as yet they have cut no channel to drain the lake and will not for many years.

As the story you've just read tells, the Andrews Settlement Area of Potter County is a hot bed for ghostly actvity... Considering one of the most infamous crimes ever in Potter County ocurred there as the following story tells....

The first murderer in the county was committed on the morning of August 11,1838 by Joshua Jones. He shot his wife in her bed, shooting her in the head with his rifle.After committing the crime, he went on with his daily duties, hoping a neighbor would stop by and find her body and think that she committed suicide. He later confessed to his crime and sold his body to Dr. Amos French of Coudersport. It was said that he bought candy and luxuries with the money and became fat while in jail. On the evening of 5/21/1839 he escaped his jail cell. He was recaptured and hung 5/31/1839 on the courthouse square. It seemed that when he sold his body to Dr. French he had stipulated that the Doctor should resuscitate him; which gave idea to a poem which appeared sometime after the hanging, purported to have been written by Joshua's ghost. Some say that the ground around were the Jones' farm stood is cursed to this day........

This was the first and only execution in Potter County. Joshua Jones' skull can still be seen in the Historical Museum in Coudersport.

The Headless Frenchman of Kettle Creek........

Around the area of Kettle Creek in Potter County is the old abandon Twin Sisters silver mine which has it's own ghost as recorded in many historical accounts I first heard of this story after reading the book " Amazing Indeed" by local resident Robert Lyman. Below is a summary of the tale.....

-Twin Sisters- This old, abandoned smelter is haunted by the ghost of a Frenchman. He was captured by Indians and beheaded in an attempt to drive the white man's mining party away. The ghost is said to appear by the old smelter in October during the full moon.

We also have the honor of being home to one of the very few cases of Human Combustion read on................

It was Coudersport Pennsylvania when one of the few known cases of human spontaneous combustion occurred. It was at the home of a Dr. Bentley, a 92 year old retired doctor.

Spontaneous human combustion is a phenomenon in which an internally generated flame suddenly consumes the victims flesh and bone.

Dr Bently's walker was found tipped over against the tub and all that remained of Dr Bentley was a charred portion of his leg and foot (with slipper).( pictures of this case will be coming soon>)

Below is one of the most haunting and freakish murders ever commited in the area ( we're a low crime area i'm working with what i got!)  This story comes from the nieghboring county of Mckean.

Here is the story of Ralph Crossmire, Who's ghost is still said to haunt the Mckean County Courthouse and McKean County's old Jail

Ralph Crossmire who today paid the penalty of his life on the gallows, for the heartless murder of an innocent mother was a tall, broad shouldered, sinewy man and about 27 years of age. He had black hair, cut pompadour, and since his incarceration had grown a full beard of a brownish hue. His eyes were large, partook of a grayish color, and fierce in appearance. He was an amateur sprinter and gave more than one exhibition of his skill in the corridor of the jail during his imprisonment. He was quite an adept in making "curios," and many articles made by him while awaiting for the hangman's knot to be gently adjusted around his neck and he jerked into eternity, are now worn and his skill, in that direction, appreciated by several persons in the county. Until the closing scenes of today, he has at times been very indifferent about the crime he committed and the fate which awaited him, though he confessed to one that he had broken a certain padlock about the jail in trying to secure his escape. Ralph had the distinction of being a "paid up" subscriber to the MINER.

Mrs. Lucetta Crossmire was a member of the Baptist church and the Women's Christian Temperance Union and aside from her son, was not known to have had an enemy in the world. She was the widow of the late Niles Crossmire and was aged 50 years. She did not live with her husband the last few years of his life. They were married about 30 years ago. At one time Crossmire was in straightened circumstances and on account of his many debts deeded his two farms to his wife. In later years when he desired the property trouble arose. Mrs. Crossmire refused to give up the titles. Her life was made miserable, and after 20 years of happy companionship they separated. Mrs. Crossmire went to Eldred to live. December 1891 Crossmire died and his widow decided to return to the old homestead and take care of her father-in-law, Daniel Crossmire, who is aged 83 years, and look after the farm. She was a kind, affectionate, hard working woman, who had seen lots of trouble, but was beloved and esteemed by all her neighbors and those who knew her.

THE CRIME.

At the close of day, on Saturday, Nov. 19, 1892, the people of Farmer's Valley were greatly excited by the discovery of the lifeless body of Mrs. Lucetta Crossmire hanging by her neck in mid-air from a rope attached to a beam in a cow stable on the Crossmire farm. It was at first thought the victim had committed suicide, but a closer observation revealed the hands of violence; and no one was surprised that 7 year old George Herzog screamed in horror when he, as the first person, saw the dreadful spectacle by the aid of a lantern in the shadows of the night.

A healthy woman who about an hour previous had left comfortable fireside to milk the cows was now only a mangled corpse suspended in mid-air by a rope. Her face was covered with blood, her tongue protruded from a smothered countenance and her skirts were torn from the body and lay on the floor beneath the victim. An old cloth sun bonnet was loosely placed upon the dead woman's head, and her artificial teeth were found near by the scenes of violence.

All who saw the surroundings were sure that the old lady did not commit suicide but had been murdered, and the rope which had previously been used to tie a cow in the stable, but now neatly adjusted around the neck of the victim by a "hangman's knot" of four turns, was not the work of her own hands, but that of a stronger person. There were also evidences of a struggle which would not have appeared had the woman hanged herself. A pool of blood on the floor, four feet away from where the body hung, was discovered. The disheveled, iron gray hair on the head was covered with filth and gore. Men searched the stable and a larger barn adjoining it for further proof and found several tracks in the fresh snow, made by a man's rubber boots. At the corner of the little stable the snow was tramped down to a considerable extent, showing where the murderer had awaited the coming of his unsuspecting victim.

Coroner Slocum impaneled a jury who after an exciting inquest returned the following verdict: "That Lucetta Crossmire, came to her death by being choked and smothered by some party or parties unknown to the jury."

THE INTERESTING TRIAL

Ralph Crossmire, the only son of the murdered woman, who was suspected as being the perpetrator of the brutal deed, was arrested the Monday morning following the day of the crime, and lodged in the county jail at Smethport by Deputy Sheriff Clarke, to await trial for the same, which began March 2, 1893. The trial continued for three days with unabated interest each session, the court house being filled to its utmost capacity with men, women and children who were eager to hear every word of one of the most important criminal cases ever tried in McKean county. The evidence was entirely circumstantial, but the chain was woven so completely around Ralph Crossmire that scarcely any one who heard the proceedings could doubt his guilt; and after the prisoner testified in his own behalf his story being so conflicting and absurd it was more the evident that Ralph Crossmire had choked to death the mother who 27 years ago had born an offspring destined to be a matricide.

SUMMARY OF THE EVIDENCE.

Ralph Crossmire probably spent the greater portion of the day on which the murder was committed in the hay mow waiting for Mrs. Crossmire to come to the stable. When milking time arrived, from his lookout he saw her. Then he jumped down from his place of concealment and walked around to the corner of the barn where footprints appeared in the snow. He stood there until Mrs. Crossmire entered the stable and fed the cattle. Then, as she sat milking, he probably stole upon her from behind and clutching her tightly by the throat dragged her backward to a spot where he had sufficient room for his bloody work. Then as she lay prone on her back, to make sure of his victim, he struck her with a heavy piece of wood upon her face and forehead. Then to make it appear a case of suicide the assassin secured a rope which had tied a cow and hung the dead woman as she was found. It was a bungling job and deceived no one.

THE VERDICT OF THE JURY

The case was given to the jury about midnight Saturday, March 4, who after eighteen hours of calm deliberation returned a verdict of murder in the first degree.

Eugene Mullin, Esq. , the able defendant for Crossmire made an effort to secure a new trial for his client but the motion was over ruled by Judge Morrison who, at the close of the Argument court, March 14.

SENTENCED

Crossmire to be hanged. When the prisoner was brought before the court, to receive the sentence, in answer to the usual question if he had anything to say why the sentence of death should not passed upon him, he said without a tremor, " I don't know why it should." "If you have," continued Judge Morrison, "We will hear you." "I have nothing to say only that Miss Pelton, the principal witness against me, is a bad troublesome woman, always down on our folks." Judge Morrison then said: "It is the sentence of this court that you, the said Ralph Crossmire, be taken from this place to the jail in the county of McKean, from whence you came, there to be hanged by the neck, according to law until you are dead, and you are now committed to the custody of the Sheriff aforesaid for the purpose of having this sentence carried into execution

The Legend of Rose Lake

Long before the advent of the Whites, there lived in Central New York an Indian boy by the name of Oriado. When grown up he was called Big Tree or White Pine, a name given him on account of his unusual stature.

As a child he was noted as queer on account of his gentle conduct and his fondness for flowers and birds rather than for the usual sports of the young Indian boy.

In due time he acquired a wigwam and a squaw and to them several children were born, including a daughter. As a warrior White Pine was one of the bravest and most tireless, as a hunter he had no superiors but when the strife was over he was noted for his peaceful disposition – and in hunting would never kill more than was absolutely necessary for present needs.

Returning home with a war party he found his wife had died during his absence and never again did White Pine engage in war with the neighboring tribes.

With his children he removed to the Oswah-yah (now known as Oswayo), "The beautiful River of Pines" or the "Lovely Valley of Pines," a fanciful and descriptive name.

The stream, considerably larger than since the timber has been cut, clear as crystal, gliding along silently in long reaches, then rippling over gravel bars where the deer came to drink, not timid for there was little to make them afraid.

The valley broad was covered with magnificent timber thickly interspersed with lordly white pine, towering far above the beech, maple and elm trees, the forest floor covered with plants and wild flowers, flecked here and there with splotches of sunshine where it had filtered through the dense forest of leaves overhead.

The bordering hills for miles and miles were covered to the very top with pine and hemlock that some years later brought wealth to many families.

Nowhere in Northern Pennsylvania could be found a fairer location for a home for one who loved nature. Fish, game and fur bearing animals were plentiful and easily captured.

The pine trees were always furnishing music, murmuring and whispering their Nature songs – never silent. During a storm or wind loud and clear, sinking away to a whisper when the air was quiet, but never entirely silent, sweeter music than any man-made instrument ever produced.

Only to the lonesome is the song of the pine tree a "moaning" sound. In its louder tones it is a song of joy and gladness and its whispering is like the soft crooning of the mother over the fretful child in her arms.

Into this beautiful Valley of the Oswah-yah came the sorrowful red man and not far from what is now the village of Ceres, he erected a new lodge and a new home, supplying its wants from the woods and streams which furnished an abundance.

This section of Northern Pennsylvania was then neutral ground, especially in peace time, there being no permanent villages, but visitors were not uncommon from hunting parties and those traveling to and fro between the Allegheny and Genesee waters.

The daughter grew to be an accomplished and handsome maiden according to Indian standards and, on account of her great beauty, was called the White Lily.

Many a young hunter from the Genesee and the Allegheny sought her for wife to grace his wigwam and cook his game, but for a long time she would have none of them.

Finally a young (and of course handsome) Seneca from the Genesee succeeded in winning her favor. The two young people moved to his lodge on the Genesee somewhere near the state line where they lived happily and contented.

Once each year the young people visited White Pine for a few days and once each year the visit was returned. To the White Lily and her brave only a single child, a daughter, was born. She was given the Indian name "Sawque-Hanna," which meant Trailing Arbutus.

One day a hunger from the Allegheny stopped at the peaceful home of White Lily and her husband, remaining for several days.

He became infatuated with her, paying her every attention, and finally proposing that she leave her husband and go with him to his home on the Allegheny and become his wife.

His request was received with scorn and he was ordered by her never to enter the lodge again. The hunter left in a rage, declaring that he would return later and that she should become his squaw.

A year later the hunter came back accompanied by three others. He was seen by White Lily and she was filled with foreboding for herself and her family.

That night after the return of her husband from the chase, the door of the lodge was burst open and an arrow from the hunter’s bow killed the husband and a second arrow took the life of Trailing Arbutus as she sat on her father’s lap.

The lodge was destroyed after such of its contents as was considered valuable and could easily be transported was removed.

The hands of White Lily were bound behind her back and a start made for the Allegheny waters. When near what is now Andrews Settlement a stop was made for breakfast, shortly after daylight, and here the bereaved White Lily was unbound that she might eat.

Here the hunter spoke for the first time saying, "I told you that you should be mine. Indians never lie. In two days we will eat at my wigwam on the Allegheny and you shall be my squaw."

White Lily, watching her opportunity here, made a break for liberty and sped like a frightened deer away from the hated hunters. Pursuit was almost immediate as the hunters recovered from their surprise.

As she came in sight of the beautiful little lake not far away, surrounded by primeval forest, it was evident to her that she could not escape the unwanted hunters.

White Lily, breaking into the death song of her tribe, plunged into the icy cold waters and when near the center of the lake, throwing her arms toward the sky above, with a wild despairing cry to the Great Spirit, sank forever.

The pursuers were dumbfounded, but soon recovering made a diligent search about the banks and fallen trees that here and there lay partially submerged in the water.

They could not believe that White Lily could have been drowned after seeing the speed and apparent ease with which she had reached the middle of the small lake, but rather thought the sinking was a ruse and that she had swum under water and hidden under some treetop or old log, later on to reach the shore and proceed to her old home down the Oswah-yah.

Search failed to find any trace of White Lily and, leaving the youngest of their party concealed to watch the shore nearest the Oswah-yah, the three others returned and moved their belongings and stolen property to the shores of the lake.

Scarcely had they reached the shores of the lake when dark clouds, wind, thunder and lightning were terrific, the trees bowed before the storm, and the very earth trembled and seemed to rock and crumple as with internal disturbances.

The rugged hemlock under which they had taken refuge was shattered and the earth was turned up as by the hand of the Great Spirit.

And from that day to this, the waters of the lake which before had flowed into the Oswah-yah, found an outlet into the Genesee, flowing by the one-time home of White Lily.

The three hunters were killed and their bodies burned almost to cinders by the lightning – a fitting retribution at the hands of the Red Man’s God.

The fourth Indian left to watch the lake shore escaped with his life and conscience stricken fled down the Oswah-yah, telling his tale to some temporary residents who returned with him to search for the body of White Lily.

The body was never found, the Lake being very deep, and although watch was kept for some time the body never came to the surface.

In examining a treetop bent over into the lake, the last of the murderers missed his footing, fell into the waters, sank to the bottom of the lake and perished miserably.

The following year, at the point where the Indian wife entered the lake, a bunch of water lilies grew to the surface of the water, much finer and larger than the surrounding plants and the blossoms were unusually large and of a pearly whiteness, the surrounding plants producing only yellow flowers.

From this time on the lake was known as White Lily Lake and the white blossoms were believed to be the spirit of White Lily who had perished in these waters. No Indian would ever pluck one of the white blossoms appearing each succeeding year.

White Pine, whose mind had weakened year by year, could not seem to realize that his daughter was no more. He waited in vain for the annual visit and finally took the trail to meet her, passing beyond the lake and down the stream where he made a home, waiting for one who was to come no more.

Passing hunters visited and assisted him when possible. He was able to supply himself with game although an old man was reverenced by the hunters as one particularly under the charge and care of the Great Spirit.

One day early in the Spring, a party of hunters visited the lodge to find it abandoned and the roof fallen in. Nearby was the body of White Pine, his clothing rotten as though exposed to many winter storms, though the body itself appeared as though death had occurred but a few hours before. At his feet was the decayed remains of his dog.

Here was proof positive to the minds of the Indians of the care and love of the Great Spirit for one of his cherished children. Among all the Indian tribes the weak and feeble minded were considered as under the special care and love of the Indian’s God.

They carefully removed the body to the top of the hill with the bones of the dog and the implements of the chase, where all were interred and a mound of earth raised, the last resting place of White Pine.

Rose Lake is the only natural lake in Potter County, located near Andrews Settlement in Allegany Township. When this section was surveyed for settlement it was given the name of Rose Lake, so called for the name of one of the surveyors, Mr. Rose.

The story of the changing of the outlet of the lake from the Oswayo to the Genesee was told by O. J. Rees, a Potter County surveyor, many years ago.

The authority given was an Indian hunter’s story of more than a hundred years ago and handed down "that the occurrence was the vengeance of the Great Spirit on three bad Indians who had driven to death in the lake a squaw they had captured."

The final ending of White Pine, another story we heard long ago, of an Indian called Big Tree who came up the Oswah-yah to meet his daughter, waiting long for her appearance in vain.

More than forty years ago a mound was opened on the top of the hill below Andrews Settlement overlooking the old Indian trail.

In it was found the jaw bone of a man, a few of the larger bones, a bone or two of a dog and stone implements used by the Red Man before the coming of the whites.

From measurements that could be made the man found in the mound must have been all of seven feet in height.

The fragmental stories so interlock that they conclusively prove to be one story – The White Lily, Pine Tree of the Oswah-yah and Big Tree of the Genesee.

It would not take very much of an excavation today to turn the waters of Rose Lake from the Genesee back to the Oswayo.

Another writer of long ago explained the formation of Rose Lake thusly; The great ice cap of the north that moved southward in Pleistocene days, bringing the debris of hills and valleys with it, reached its main limits near Olean and the present day Rock City where the melting ice left stranded the great gravel hills there.

But the line shifted with the seasons. Sometime, a long tongue of ice slid up the valley of the Oswayo and up the channel of this ancient creek, pushing the soil before it, to build this little hill that dams the valley and created this lake.

But little drainage flows into this lake from the upper hills of the watershed. The lake forms a stabilizer for the currents that flow quietly out of it at flood times, eventually to reach the Genesee; so quietly that as yet they have cut no channel to drain the lake and will not for many years.

As the story you've just read tells, the Andrews Settlement Area of Potter County is a hot bed for ghostly actvity... Considering one of the most infamous crimes ever in Potter County ocurred there as the following story tells....

 Ralph Crossmire who today paid the penalty of his life on the gallows, for the heartless murder of an innocent mother was a tall, broad shouldered, sinewy man and about 27 years of age. He had black hair, cut pompadour, and since his incarceration had grown a full beard of a brownish hue. His eyes were large, partook of a grayish color, and fierce in appearance. He was an amateur sprinter and gave more than one exhibition of his skill in the corridor of the jail during his imprisonment. He was quite an adept in making "curios," and many articles made by him while awaiting for the hangman's knot to be gently adjusted around his neck and he jerked into eternity, are now worn and his skill, in that direction, appreciated by several persons in the county. Until the closing scenes of today, he has at times been very indifferent about the crime he committed and the fate which awaited him, though he confessed to one that he had broken a certain padlock about the jail in trying to secure his escape. Ralph had the distinction of being a "paid up" subscriber to the MINER.

Mrs. Lucetta Crossmire was a member of the Baptist church and the Women's Christian Temperance Union and aside from her son, was not known to have had an enemy in the world. She was the widow of the late Niles Crossmire and was aged 50 years. She did not live with her husband the last few years of his life. They were married about 30 years ago. At one time Crossmire was in straightened circumstances and on account of his many debts deeded his two farms to his wife. In later years when he desired the property trouble arose. Mrs. Crossmire refused to give up the titles. Her life was made miserable, and after 20 years of happy companionship they separated. Mrs. Crossmire went to Eldred to live. December 1891 Crossmire died and his widow decided to return to the old homestead and take care of her father-in-law, Daniel Crossmire, who is aged 83 years, and look after the farm. She was a kind, affectionate, hard working woman, who had seen lots of trouble, but was beloved and esteemed by all her neighbors and those who knew her.

THE CRIME.

At the close of day, on Saturday, Nov. 19, 1892, the people of Farmer's Valley were greatly excited by the discovery of the lifeless body of Mrs. Lucetta Crossmire hanging by her neck in mid-air from a rope attached to a beam in a cow stable on the Crossmire farm. It was at first thought the victim had committed suicide, but a closer observation revealed the hands of violence; and no one was surprised that 7 year old George Herzog screamed in horror when he, as the first person, saw the dreadful spectacle by the aid of a lantern in the shadows of the night.

A healthy woman who about an hour previous had left comfortable fireside to milk the cows was now only a mangled corpse suspended in mid-air by a rope. Her face was covered with blood, her tongue protruded from a smothered countenance and her skirts were torn from the body and lay on the floor beneath the victim. An old cloth sun bonnet was loosely placed upon the dead woman's head, and her artificial teeth were found near by the scenes of violence.

All who saw the surroundings were sure that the old lady did not commit suicide but had been murdered, and the rope which had previously been used to tie a cow in the stable, but now neatly adjusted around the neck of the victim by a "hangman's knot" of four turns, was not the work of her own hands, but that of a stronger person. There were also evidences of a struggle which would not have appeared had the woman hanged herself. A pool of blood on the floor, four feet away from where the body hung, was discovered. The disheveled, iron gray hair on the head was covered with filth and gore. Men searched the stable and a larger barn adjoining it for further proof and found several tracks in the fresh snow, made by a man's rubber boots. At the corner of the little stable the snow was tramped down to a considerable extent, showing where the murderer had awaited the coming of his unsuspecting victim.

Coroner Slocum impaneled a jury who after an exciting inquest returned the following verdict: "That Lucetta Crossmire, came to her death by being choked and smothered by some party or parties unknown to the jury."

THE INTERESTING TRIAL

Ralph Crossmire, the only son of the murdered woman, who was suspected as being the perpetrator of the brutal deed, was arrested the Monday morning following the day of the crime, and lodged in the county jail at Smethport by Deputy Sheriff Clarke, to await trial for the same, which began March 2, 1893. The trial continued for three days with unabated interest each session, the court house being filled to its utmost capacity with men, women and children who were eager to hear every word of one of the most important criminal cases ever tried in McKean county. The evidence was entirely circumstantial, but the chain was woven so completely around Ralph Crossmire that scarcely any one who heard the proceedings could doubt his guilt; and after the prisoner testified in his own behalf his story being so conflicting and absurd it was more the evident that Ralph Crossmire had choked to death the mother who 27 years ago had born an offspring destined to be a matricide.

SUMMARY OF THE EVIDENCE.

Ralph Crossmire probably spent the greater portion of the day on which the murder was committed in the hay mow waiting for Mrs. Crossmire to come to the stable. When milking time arrived, from his lookout he saw her. Then he jumped down from his place of concealment and walked around to the corner of the barn where footprints appeared in the snow. He stood there until Mrs. Crossmire entered the stable and fed the cattle. Then, as she sat milking, he probably stole upon her from behind and clutching her tightly by the throat dragged her backward to a spot where he had sufficient room for his bloody work. Then as she lay prone on her back, to make sure of his victim, he struck her with a heavy piece of wood upon her face and forehead. Then to make it appear a case of suicide the assassin secured a rope which had tied a cow and hung the dead woman as she was found. It was a bungling job and deceived no one.

THE VERDICT OF THE JURY

The case was given to the jury about midnight Saturday, March 4, who after eighteen hours of calm deliberation returned a verdict of murder in the first degree.

Eugene Mullin, Esq. , the able defendant for Crossmire made an effort to secure a new trial for his client but the motion was over ruled by Judge Morrison who, at the close of the Argument court, March 14.

SENTENCED

Crossmire to be hanged. When the prisoner was brought before the court, to receive the sentence, in answer to the usual question if he had anything to say why the sentence of death should not passed upon him, he said without a tremor, " I don't know why it should." "If you have," continued Judge Morrison, "We will hear you." "I have nothing to say only that Miss Pelton, the principal witness against me, is a bad troublesome woman, always down on our folks." Judge Morrison then said: "It is the sentence of this court that you, the said Ralph Crossmire, be taken from this place to the jail in the county of McKean, from whence you came, there to be hanged by the neck, according to law until you are dead, and you are now committed to the custody of the Sheriff aforesaid for the purpose of having this sentence carried into execution

Potter County Giants ........

In December 1886, W.H. Scoville, of Andrew's settlement, discovered a mound in Ellisburg. On exploring, it was found to contain parts of a skeleton of a man measuring between seven and eight feet tall. A large birch tree grew on top of the mound, and around it were hemlocks two and two and one half feet in diameter